Truman Newspaper features two ART professors

The Index, Truman’s student newspaper, featured articles on two Art Department professors in their March 24th edition.  Jim Jereb was featured in a tribute article about his retirement. Jim, who has taught at Truman for  26 years, will be moving to Big Horn, Wyoming, to take up a curatorial position at the Brinton Museum there.  He will also head the printmaking section of the museum’s new education center.

The second article featured Priya Kambli, our professor of photography, who presented her work at the St. Louis Art Museum.  The symposium, “If it Wasn’t for the Women: Women of Color Behind and Through the Lens,” was a Women’s History Month event.  “If It Wasn’t for the Women” is a free annual program that brings special attention to women of color and their experiences in the arts.  This year the focus was on photography.

Mami 2015: A recent work by Professor Priya Kambli.

Mami 2015: A recent work by Professor Priya Kambli.

National Soup Day in Printmaking I

Priscilla Parisa made a lovely video to share what a day in Printmaking I was like.  It happened to be National Soup Day and after the images of preparing and printing some very nice artworks the students and Jim Jereb, Professor of Printmaking, celebrate with steaming bowls of goodness.  Just another lovely day in the print studio.  Thanks for sharing, Priscilla!

 

Jim Jereb’s Prints on Display

Pickler Memorial Library at Truman is exhibiting the art of printmaking professor Jim Jereb until March 25th.  The coffee shop exhibit area, located on the first floor of the library, displays prints that reflect the diversity of techniques Jereb uses in his work.

Jim Jereb's prints on display at the coffee shop in Pickler Memorial Library.

Jim Jereb’s prints on display at the coffee shop in Pickler Memorial Library.

Jereb has been a professor of art at Truman since August 1990 and oversees the printmaking program. He uses many varied techniques in this show including relief, intaglio, lithography, and serigraphy (silk screening).

Printmaking generally begins with a flat, smooth material known as a matrix. Through the various technical approaches on display, several different substances (zinc or copper metal plates, Bavarian limestone, end-grain maple and polyester sheets, to name a few) are manipulated to create a surface that, when inked, will generate the desired image. Paper is pressed against the hand-inked surface to force the ink into the paper fibers. This physical contact of hand-manipulated materials, supplies, processes and machinery gives creative printmaking its rich densities and evocative imagery.