Science Faculty Purchase Student Art

Art student Elle Renault’s painting p53 was selected from the recent Flora and Fauna exhibition to be purchased and displayed indefinitely in Magruder Hall. Congratulations to Elle for being selected and having the honor of her work remaining on display at Truman State University! Thanks to Dr. Anne Moody for organizing this people’s choice award and to the science faculty that donated money to purchase the work! We hope to continue this interdepartmental tradition with subsequent Flora and Fauna exhibitions going forward.

Truman Student Madi McClain Makes Her Mark

Madilyn (Madi) McClain had a work accepted into the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art’s Undergraduate Juried Exhibition! The organizers of the exhibition report that only approximately 25% of the submitted works were selected for display.

Madi McClain, Recline, Watercolor and graphite

The juried undergraduate exhibition will be on view from April 13-June 2 at the Albrecht-Kemper Museum in St. Louis.  The Opening Reception is free to the public on Friday, April 12 from 4-7pm.

Congratulations Madi! We are very proud to have you at Truman.

Alumna Nala Turner Featured in All The Art

Nala Turner, whose 2018 BFA ceramics show consisted of a series of very large vessels inspired by important women in her life, is interviewed in the spring 2019 issue of All The Art, the Visual Art Quarterly of St. Louis.  In addition to the two-page spread on pages 16 and 17, Nala’s work is featured on both the front and back covers.

Nala Turner now attends Pratt Institute in New York City, where she is doing well.  For more information, take a look at her article.  Congratulations on your recognition, Nala!  We are really proud of you!

Welcome Back! With snowy images from new Lindsey Dunnagan show

Truman’s Spring 2019 semester begins on Monday.  We are getting about six inches of snow before classes start, so be safe as you come back to campus.


Moonlit Crossing, courtesy of the artist.

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan begins 2019 with a new show in the Twin Cities area (in Silverwood Park, Saint Anthony, on the northern side of Minneapolis). Her exhibition, “Skimming Boundaries,” was rooted in her experience with her grandmother, who battled Alzheimer’s Disease for the last ten years of her life.

In her artist’s statement, Professor Dunnagan writes:

A Familiar Face, courtesy of the artist.

 

In the beginning, her illness showed in small ways as she repeated stories she told just days before.  Toward the middle of the disease, she began reinventing the history of her life. Toward the end, my grandmother didn’t know who I was.  She lost the ability to recognize family.  Conversations with her became circular as her short-term memory began to fail as well.  In the moments when the recognizable parts of her seemed to flicker in and out, I often wondered where she had gone.  It seemed as if a part of her was testing the waters of another realm even though her physical body remained vital.

 

In this series, I explore the intangible world of the spirit and the boundary that separates us. Religion maps out worlds of before and after death, but even the most secular are confronted these questions. What is the journey between life and death?  Where are the edges?  In this series, I search for what is felt but unseen.

Blinking Current, courtesy of the artist.

Much of the work experiments with natural dyes, a technique I learned while serving in Morocco as a Peace Corps Volunteer.  Vegetation such as raspberries and cabbage are boiled and poured over mordanted paper, resulting in permanent reds, blues, and greens.  Rocks and black walnuts provide tones of sepia and simultaneously act as a resist, allowing the places they weigh down in the paper to remain white.  Sometimes paper is buried overnight and exposed to the rain or wrapped around trees to capture the imprint of bark.

The dying process, courtesy of Lindsey Dunnagan.

Stay tuned for all the exciting events coming up this spring semester at Truman.  And Welcome Back!

Last Chance to See…

The exhibition MicroEcos is in its final week.  This show features the work of multimedia artists Brandon Gellis and Shelby Shadwell and includes photographs, drawings, interactive media, and sculpture of various sorts.  You are sure to find something intriguing in the University Gallery and the Charlyn Gallery.  Come take a look before Friday, as Thursday is the last day the gallery will be open for you to view this wonderful work. 

 

What is going on in the first floor hallway?

In case you have been wondering:

Laura Bigger sends this report:

Students in the Intermediate Drawings Explorations course are working on large-scale drawings on the walls in Ophelia Parrish near the gallery. Passersby have the opportunity to see work in progress through November 14th. Finished work will remain until late November. Make sure to check out the students’ work!

Second Annual Blow Stuff Up on the Quad Exhibition!

 

September 14th, 2018, was a bright sunny day with relatively little wind — the perfect day to showcase the work of Advanced Sculpture, as taught by Professor Danielle Yakle.  As they did last year, students outdid themselves with playful over-life-sized toys taking over the great lawn between Ophelia Parrish and Baldwin Halls.