New Gallery Shows Opening This Week

We have three great exhibitions opening in the University Art Gallery this week.

Retrospective: Wynne Wilbur – in the Main Gallery

Wynne Wilbur, Flower (2017).  Image courtesy of the artist.

View a career-spanning retrospective of work created by Truman ceramics professor Wynne Wilbur.

Emily Nickel, Undoing. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Dreamwork: New Work by ceramicists Leah Bowring, Emily Nickel, and Alexander Thierry – in the Main Gallery

Dreamwork features three ceramic artists, Truman alumni all, who encompass a broad range of approaches to ceramics: Leah BowringEmily NickelAlexander Thierry. Dreamwork refers to the psychoanalytic concept that our unconscious often disguises truths in our dreams from our conscious mind, but, more broadly, the works in this exhibition address the work the mind undertakes when creating memories, fantasizing, meditating, and dreaming.

Harry Tjutjuna, Wati Nyiru Munu Wati Wanka. Photo courtesy of the University of Virginia.

Claiming Country: Western Desert Painting from the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection – in the Charlyn Gallery (Exhibition on view until March 22).The Western Desert, located in west central Australia, is home to many of Australia’s indigenous communities and is seen as the birthplace of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement. Indigenous Australian art is often based on Dreamings, called Tjukurrpa in the Western Desert region. Dreamings link Aboriginal peoples to their sacred lands, often referred to as Country, through narratives of ancestors and creator beings. Western Desert artists bridge the gap between traditional Aboriginal practices and the contemporary art world by expressing Tjukurrpa in their work through ceremonial iconography and aerial perspectives of sacred landscapes associated with creator beings and ancestors. The paintings in Claiming Country explore the essential role that Country plays in the identities of Indigenous Australians. This exhibition brings together paintings by prominent Western Desert artists Pansy Napangardi, Makinti Napanangka, Weaver Jack, Harry Tjutjuna, Kathleen Petyarre, Tjumpo Tjapanangka, and Paddy Japaljarri Sims.

These works have graciously been loaned to Truman State University from the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, the only museum outside of Australia dedicated to the exhibition and study of Indigenous Australian art.

Opening reception for all three of these exhibitions will take place Friday, January 25, 6:00-8:00 p.m.

 

Welcome Back! With snowy images from new Lindsey Dunnagan show

Truman’s Spring 2019 semester begins on Monday.  We are getting about six inches of snow before classes start, so be safe as you come back to campus.


Moonlit Crossing, courtesy of the artist.

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan begins 2019 with a new show in the Twin Cities area (in Silverwood Park, Saint Anthony, on the northern side of Minneapolis). Her exhibition, “Skimming Boundaries,” was rooted in her experience with her grandmother, who battled Alzheimer’s Disease for the last ten years of her life.

In her artist’s statement, Professor Dunnagan writes:

A Familiar Face, courtesy of the artist.

 

In the beginning, her illness showed in small ways as she repeated stories she told just days before.  Toward the middle of the disease, she began reinventing the history of her life. Toward the end, my grandmother didn’t know who I was.  She lost the ability to recognize family.  Conversations with her became circular as her short-term memory began to fail as well.  In the moments when the recognizable parts of her seemed to flicker in and out, I often wondered where she had gone.  It seemed as if a part of her was testing the waters of another realm even though her physical body remained vital.

 

In this series, I explore the intangible world of the spirit and the boundary that separates us. Religion maps out worlds of before and after death, but even the most secular are confronted these questions. What is the journey between life and death?  Where are the edges?  In this series, I search for what is felt but unseen.

Blinking Current, courtesy of the artist.

Much of the work experiments with natural dyes, a technique I learned while serving in Morocco as a Peace Corps Volunteer.  Vegetation such as raspberries and cabbage are boiled and poured over mordanted paper, resulting in permanent reds, blues, and greens.  Rocks and black walnuts provide tones of sepia and simultaneously act as a resist, allowing the places they weigh down in the paper to remain white.  Sometimes paper is buried overnight and exposed to the rain or wrapped around trees to capture the imprint of bark.

The dying process, courtesy of Lindsey Dunnagan.

Stay tuned for all the exciting events coming up this spring semester at Truman.  And Welcome Back!

Students Contribute to Fundraiser for Food Bank

Ceramics majors and other art students made bowls for a fundraiser for the Pantry for Adair County, an organization that provides help for those in our community who experience food insecurity.  The “Empty Bowl Soup Lunch” sold tickets for a meal consisting of soup, pie, and beverage.  People attending could choose to take a bowl that was made by an artist, for $30, including the luncheon, or one that was simply “unique,” which only cost $20, including food.  It was a big success and the students’ bowls sold out well before the end of the event.  Thank you to everyone who made this a success!

Bowls arrayed for selection at the “Empty Soup Bowl Lunch,”sponsored by the Pantry for Adair County on November 10th.  Among these are many made by Truman students.

Art Bus: Encounters with Professional Practice

As of the fall of 2018 ll new Art majors will take a new class, designed to give them a taste of life as a working artist or art historian in a city setting. The “Art Bus: Encounters with Professional Practice” runs over a long weekend, allowing student to travel as a group to a major metropolitan area somwhere relatively close by, within 5-6 hours drive.   Depending on the location to be visited (which depends to a certain extent on who is leading the trip), students will visit artists’ studios, meet with gallery directors, talk with Art Department alumni, and visit art museums. The first time this class was run was this fall, when Print professor Laura Bigger took a small group of students to Minneapolis, where they had a great deal of fun and spent time at the Walker Art Museum.

Last Week to See

The fall faculty show, “New Work by Truman State Art Faculty,” in the University Gallery and the Charlyn Gallery (formerly known as the Side Gallery)  will be up through Friday of this week (10/5).  If you haven’t caught the photographs and installation by Priya Kambli in the main gallery and “Grown-Up Games” by Danielle Yakle in the Charlyn Gallery, you are in for a treat.

Above and below, work by Priya Kambli, professor of art.

And below, students Josh Fackler and Josh Fish enjoy Instructor Danielle Yakle’s “Grown-Up Games.”

Second Annual Blow Stuff Up on the Quad Exhibition!

 

September 14th, 2018, was a bright sunny day with relatively little wind — the perfect day to showcase the work of Advanced Sculpture, as taught by Professor Danielle Yakle.  As they did last year, students outdid themselves with playful over-life-sized toys taking over the great lawn between Ophelia Parrish and Baldwin Halls.

 

Alumni Artists to Visit Campus

MimiJimmyFLyer

Thanks to funding from the School of Arts and Letters we are happy to have Mimi Kato and Jimmy Kuehnle visit campus to give talks about their work.  Both are successful artists, living and working in Cleveland, Ohio. We hope you will be able to join us to hear about their current creative work.

The flyer has an image from Mimi Kato’s work; an example of Jimmy Kuehnle’s work is below.

Summer 2018 Plein Air Painting Course in Spain

Photographs from Professor Lindsey Dunnagan’s summer study abroad course in Spain. Ten students went to paint “en plein air” in May of 2018, and had a wonderful time making art. And doing a few other things!

(For a larger image, double click below and you will be able to look more closely at what the students did and produced on their adventure)

Updates on some recent graduates

Congratulations to the following students who have sent us their recent news:

Katie Feldkamp, a 2017 Art History/History double major, will be attending graduate school abroad this fall. She writes:

I will be attending the University of St. Andrews in Scotland this September for their Museum and Gallery Studies MLitt program. The program is a year-long course that focuses on practical hands-on skills as well as more theoretical coursework and provides students with broad training in all types of museums, galleries and other heritage facilities.

Lisa Simms’ news comes from painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan:

Lisa Simms has been working as a Teaching Artist at Resident Arts in Columbus, MO.  She works with teen artists to teach them different painting techniques and they are also working on a large public mural along the MKT trail under Elm Street.  The position will come to a close around the end of the summer when the full-time person returns from maternity leave.

Lisa Simms (right) with professor Lindsey Dunnagan (left) at Simms’ capstone exhibit.

Art History grad Kathryn Hodge, who has been a curatorial intern at the St. Louis Art Museum this summer, writes to say she has accepted a part time position with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers as a client services specialist.  As she has always been interested in the collecting aspect of art, this is a great move for her.  We wish her the best of success!


If you are a Truman art student alumna/alumnus and would like to share your adventures with us, please write us at art@truman.edu.  We’d love to hear from you!