Welcome to Truman (and Welcome Back!)

This week saw the first year students move in, and start their classes.  Sunday is the day of return for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Classes start on Monday, but several faculty are incorporating the total eclipse into their assignments* and many classes will not actually meet until Wednesday.  Whenever your classes start, Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, we are happy you are going to be here.

*While Kirksville doesn’t get more than 98% coverage of the sun by the moon, just 60 miles to the south you can experience totality.

Goodbye to Dr. Julia DeLancey

Dr. DeLancey with current students and alumni at her goodbye reception.

We are saddened to say goodbye to Art Historian Dr. Julia DeLancey, who will be moving to Virginia for a new academic position.  She has been at Truman for more than twenty years, and although we will miss her, we wish her luck in her new position.  A reception was held in the University Gallery on July 20th, in honor of her and her husband, Dr. Peter Kelly, and several students and alumni were able to say goodbye in person.

Art Faculty Attend Institute in Asheville, NC

Art faculty Julia DeLancey, Aaron Fine, Aaron Neeley, and Sara Orel, along with Amanda Langendoerfer, who is the Head of Special Collections and University Museums at Truman, attended a Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges Summer Institute on Liberal Learning in Asheville from June 8-10, 2017.  This year the annual institute focused on art programs.  Titled “Adaptations: Working in Art Departments at Public Liberal Arts Colleges,” the program brought together faculty from 18 universities to share ideas and discuss such topics as encouraging undergraduate research in Art, teaching Art History without having major museum collections nearby, and partnering with community arts organizations.

Photograph of participants in the COPLAC Summer Institute, courtesy of Emma Anderson.

Truman Faculty (all in the front row): Aaron Neeley, Julia DeLancey (2nd and 3rd from the left, respectively), Sara Orel (8th from left), Amanda Langendoerfer (5th from right), and Aaron Fine (2nd from right).

At the Institute Truman faculty also had the opportunity to congratulate the incoming Executive Director of COPLAC, our former colleague Cole Woodcox, who has retired from Truman to take the position. (He is the first person on the right in the back row of the photo above).

3D Modeling, Motion, and Animation Final Projects on Display

Come and Enjoy!

In addition, Design capstone projects are up at the Kirksville Arts Association (1902 S. Baltimore, Suite 100) this week.  The reception to celebrate their completion of the degree will be at 6 pm Friday evening at that location.  We look forward to seeing you at one or all of the events coming up this week.

BA students present work in gallery

Students completing their degrees with the BA: Liberal Arts major took over the University Gallery last week to show their work in their capstone classes.  The students whose art was featured were Olivia Brady (printmaking), Akari Kinjo (fibers/sculpture), Sabrina Lavezzi (printmaking), Hannah Nicks (ceramics), Morgan Price (ceramics), and Allyson Uhles (ceramics).  The reception to celebrate their exhibition was held on the Friday of their week in the gallery.  These pictures show some of the work and visitors enjoying the shows.

Kimono by Akari Kinjo.

Hannah Nicks’s plates on a painted wall made the ceramic work into an elaborate design of which they were only a part.

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Art Projects Look to Science for Inspiration

Art professors Lindsey Dunnagan and Francine Fox promoted interdisciplinary studies by inviting their students to sketch or paint in partnership with the sciences for first-hand experience with live, unique subjects.
Dunnagan’s class worked with science professors, including Jay Bauman, Elisabeth Hooper and Timothy Waston. Bauman taught students how to attach reflective nodes to their bodies and capture motion in 360 degrees by using special recording devices in the Piper Lab. Students painted how meaning is conveyed in body movements using the technology.

In another project, students painted plants and animals from the greenhouse using elements of a Japanese marbling technique and seed collections. Walston also set up a lab for students to investigate single cell organisms from pond water. The students also explored how other objects, such as dried plants, a cracked egg and clothes, looked when magnified a thousand times.

Teams within Fox’s class created multi-panel pieces of artwork centering on a given theme to render realistic representations of their subject matter. Later depictions also included distortions of their imagery to better communicate their concepts. Continue reading

Department Is Featured Artist

Local art gallery Gallery 104: Art on the Square highlights the Truman State University Art Department as their featured artist for the month of April.  The Art Department has had exhibition space in Gallery 104 since their opening last summer. Student artwork is on sale, and this month you can window shop for Truman artwork in the front window as well.

 

 

On March 31st, there was a reception for the exhibitors and students who attended are shown below: (from left to right, back row) Daniel Degenhardt, Hannah Nicks, Emily LaMarche, Lindsey Picht, Jenny Reagan, Audrey Kastner, Greta Dellinger, (from left to right, front row) Karlynn Naylor, Claire Nipper, Olivia Brady, and Maddie Pearson.

A poster from the “Join, Save, Buy” exhibit in the University Gallery this past February hangs in the Gallery 104 window on the Kirksville Square.

The sea serpent that spent last summer on the Quad has found a comfortable home in the gallery (his name is Wilburt, if you hadn’t heard!).

Museum Studies Students Encounter Local Animal Population

Mike Kesselheim makes friends with a live box turtle at the local Department of Conservation visitors center.

Students in Dr. Orel’s Museum Studies class this semester (Object and Collections Management) have been investigating the local fauna of Northeast Missouri in preparation for an exhibit on “Rural Roots: People and the Land” for the Ruth Towne Museum on campus next year.  They have spent some time in the Biology Department preparing specimens for display and visited the Northeast Regional Office for the Missouri Department of Conservation. (Warning: Photos of creepy/crawly creatures below)

Mike Kesselheim and Kathleen Dusseault admire a stuffed (not taxidermied!) squirrel at the Department of Conservation Visitors Center.

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