Congratulations to Lindsey Dunnagan

Our own Professor Lindsey Dunnagan has been honored as one of the Missouri Arts Council Featured Artists of the Month!


Lindsey writes: I visually explore interactions with the natural environment. At an intimate level, I am interested in home and identity. On a larger scale, I consider our spiritual ties to nature.

My creative pursuits are grounded in my Alaskan upbringing. Summers were spent hiking mountains, fishing the Russian River, and camping at bluegrass festivals. In the winter, my family cross-country skied under moonlight with miner’s headlamps. Each new season was enchanting and dangerous; it was not uncommon to pass a moose or see a black bear ahead on the trail. These experiences fostered a love of nature and a deep need to explore, discover, and create. To experience my work in person, swing by Weinberger Fine Art in Kansas City, Missouri, for my solo show, “Northern Catch,” which will be up through March.

lindseydunnagan.com

Exhibition in the Charlyn Gallery

Watchers by Natalie Gruber, detail

Watchers by Natalie Gruber, detail

Laura Bigger’s Intermediate and Advanced Drawing Exploration students present Drawing – Implied in the Charlyn Gallery. The works in the exhibition explore “drawing,” the verb, in the abstract and test the limits of what one considers a drawing. Each artist created a wall-based installation that emphasizes formal decisions to create something that reads as a drawing, considers implied line or line created by both traditional and nontraditional means, and intentionally incorporates light and shadow to draw in a three-dimensional space.

Artists include: Maggie Adams, Sarah Early, Jamie Foutch, Natalie Gruber, Abby Moreno, Stephen Poindexter and Wesley Scafe.

The exhibition runs February 1st through 25th.

Lindsey Dunnagan Exhibits in Kansas City

Ice Flare Detail 6

Ice Flare Detail 6, Mixed Media on Acrylic

Professor Lindsey Dunnagan has told us about her current exhibition at Weinberger Fine Art in Kansas City, MO. The Exhibition is titled “Northern Catch” and she writes:

This series is a pleasure project inspired by my childhood of growing up in Anchorage, Alaska where I spent time by the ocean and watched the sky for the Aurora Borealis. Each piece is multi layered and includes images offish nets, the shapes of icebergs, and patterns found in the Alaskan landscape, such as ice striations. Formally, some pieces are linked to one another because the series responds to and plays with process scraps. For example, “Migrating Silver” is made of several paper layers. The top layer has a hole cut in the shape of a fish net. Inside the hole are other fish net and ice berg shapes cut out of other paintings. Every cut form becomes part of a new work. The playful process of this work parallels my glance back at childhood. By manipulating shapes from the place I love, the work evokes a panglossian nostalgia.

Painting by Lindsey Dunnagan

Ice Flare Detail 2, mixed media on acrylic

Painting by Lindsey Dunnagan

Sun Shimmer, watercolor, graphite, and silver leaf on paper

Congratulations to Professor Priya Kambli

Our own Priya Kambli has been chosen by the Missouri Arts Council as the recipient of the Missouri Arts Award for Individual Artist – our State’s highest honor in the arts. “Honorees are recognized for their profound and lasting contributions to Missouri’s artistic and cultural legacy.”

The press release says:

Individual Artist | Priya Kambli, Kirksville

Internationally recognized photographer whose art is suffused with themes of loss, love, and memory across generations of family, inspired by the archive of family heirlooms, artworks, and photographs she brought with her to the U.S. when she migrated from India at age 18.

Congratulations to Professor Kambli!

Batik Workshop

Danielle Yakle demonstrates Batik

Professor Danielle Yakle demonstrates the process of batik to Truman students

In conjunction with the “Wandering Sprit: African Wax Prints” exhibition currently up in the gallery, we hosted a small batik workshop in the fibers studio. Indonesian batik textiles severed as the inspiration for the nineteenth-century industrial Dutch imitations that became what we call African wax print fabric today. Fibers professor Daniel Yakle and Fibers club students walked students through how to apply layers of wax resist to create patterns on dyed cotton. The results were stunning!

Students work on their batik scarves

Chetanae Ellison waves to the camera, enjoying her experimentation in wax painting on cloth.Wax painting

Stephen Poindexter paints in wax on a scarf.

Student with completed scarf

Lee Gardunia shows off a completed batik project.