Second Annual Blow Stuff Up on the Quad Exhibition!

 

September 14th, 2018, was a bright sunny day with relatively little wind — the perfect day to showcase the work of Advanced Sculpture, as taught by Professor Danielle Yakle.  As they did last year, students outdid themselves with playful over-life-sized toys taking over the great lawn between Ophelia Parrish and Baldwin Halls.

 

Spring Semester Begins

We hope you are finally warming up from bitter cold winter break (in Kirksville New Year’s day saw a high of 4 and a low of -17 degrees!). As we are now one week into the spring semester of 2018, we begin the Art Blog by wrapping up some of Fall 2017’s news.

The first thing we want to do is to encourage you to investigate the new art installation to be found in front of the McKinney Health Center (between that building and the Kirk Building).

Professor Danielle Yakle (in the middle of the picture above, wearing a turquoise beret) wrote, in her proposal asking to install the sculpture in its current location:

Their (her Introduction to Visual Arts students) idea was to create an installation of enlarged human organs and systems.  The various parts (a brain, heart, stomach, rib cage, etc.) will be assembled in the space much like an anatomical study.  While being somewhat educational, the main concept is to recreate objects, which are normally soft and temporary, as something that is solid and long-lasting.  The class was interested in the contrast between the ephemeral nature of the body compared to the hard and durable qualities of the concrete we are using for the sculpture. They hope to treat viewers to a surreal experience by positioning the interior of the body in an outdoor space.

These photographs (courtesy of Atticus Bailey) show the installation of the sculpture at the beginning of December.  The pieces are made of concrete and many are attached to the ground with large metal spikes, which will help to keep them in place as they are climbed upon.  Human body parts displayed include:

A brain – approximately 5’ long by 3’ high by 2.5’ wide

Two sets of ribs – 6’ by 4’ by 1’, connected with a bracket

A heart – 3’ by 3’ by 2.5’

A stomach – 5.5’ by 5’ by 2’

Two kidneys – 2.5’ by 1.5’ by 1.5’ each

Three lengths of large intestine – the largest is 7.5’ by 2.5’ by 2’

If you want to go by on a sunny day, the grassy space between Kirk and the Health Center seems to be a nice place to take in the view.

Dusty Folwarczny (BFA 2003) to Talk to Art Students

2003 Sculpture graduate Dusty Folwarczny will return to Truman to speak with students on Monday, October 23rd. She will be working with Priya Kambli’s Art Foundations II class in the morning and will speak to the Senior Seminar class in the evening.   In addition to her active work as a sculptor in Chicago, she co-founded a company that provides illustration services where the client is an active participant in the creation process.  ink factory has developed murals, videos, and installations of various sorts for a wide range of clients, both private businesses and community and non-profit groups.Two views of “Give,” by Dusty Folwarczny, made of salvaged steel, and 14 feet tall.

Hey! There’s an Aquarium in the OP Lobby!

Students in the Advanced Sculpture classes are at it again! For this Homecoming week, the lobby of Ophelia Parrish Hall is featuring blow-up animals, this time inside a fiber aquarium.  The sculpture is made to walk through, and the animals are far larger than life-sized.

The art installation should be up throughout the week.

Welcome Back

Tuesday, January 16th, marks our first day back from the holidays.

To celebrate your return, you can now go octopus hunting on the quad! When you walk around campus on your way between classes be sure to check out the latest installation from Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class.

Students in Danielle Yakle’s Fall 2016 Intro to the Visual Arts class with their installation outside the library.

All photos courtesy of Atticus Bailey.

Giant Acorn Art

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One of several acorns on Truman’s campus. These were a project in Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to Visual Arts class, Fall 2015. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

 

Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class ended the fall semester by installing public art across campus.  This public art was the culmination of a project they had been preparing throughout the semester.  She writes:

After studying some public sculpture the students proposed ideas for a piece they could construct and install in Kirksville. The winning idea was a series of acorn sculptures that would be spread throughout campus. The students chose the form of an acorn both as a sign of the fall season and to celebrate the student body’s fascination with our local squirrel population. The project is intended to be lighthearted and to inspire a scavenger hunt-like response. We spread the sculptures throughout the campus, encouraging viewers to explore areas beyond their usual commutes and enjoy finding the pieces unexpectedly as they go about their day.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

Each acorn sculpture is between two and three feet tall and attached to a small plinth. They are constructed with a welded steel frame covered in concrete and embellished with glass mosaic and paint. Each of the eight acorns has a specific theme and color scheme designed by its student group. While the acorns’ hollow interior helps reduce the weight of each piece, we still estimate that the sculptures weigh between 200 and 250 pounds.

Take a look around campus and see how many of them you can find.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall.  Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.