Dusty Folwarczny (BFA 2003) to Talk to Art Students

2003 Sculpture graduate Dusty Folwarczny will return to Truman to speak with students on Monday, October 23rd. She will be working with Priya Kambli’s Art Foundations II class in the morning and will speak to the Senior Seminar class in the evening.   In addition to her active work as a sculptor in Chicago, she co-founded a company that provides illustration services where the client is an active participant in the creation process.  ink factory has developed murals, videos, and installations of various sorts for a wide range of clients, both private businesses and community and non-profit groups.Two views of “Give,” by Dusty Folwarczny, made of salvaged steel, and 14 feet tall.

Art in Unexpected Places

Have you noticed any smiling or particularly hungry-looking trash cans recently?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any giraffes nibbling on your hair?  Someone just hanging on?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling very small? or REALLY hungry?

Maybe you are experiencing ART IN UNEXPECTED PLACES, a project of Professor Lindsay Dunnagan’s Advanced Painting classes.  (Top row by Daniel Degenhardt; Second row (l) Lindsay Picht, (r) Austin Dellamano; Third row (l) Mia Palumbo, (r) Lisa Simms; Fourth row: Mona Abhari; Below: photo of class at the north gate to the university.

New Public Art on Campus

Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class was at it again this spring.  As you walk around campus over the summer, see how many benches you can find that were not there at the beginning of April.*

These benches were completely fabricated by Professor Yakle’s class, with her assistance, and they are sturdy enough to last through midwestern weather.  The body of the benches is metal, and they are almost completely covered with concrete with the decoration added at the end of the process. Each bench is differently-shaped and covered with glass tiles of different colors.  They are placed around the central part of campus.  It is time for a treasure hunt!

*There are six benches.

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan on one of the benches newly installed on campus.

Student Art in the Library

In the spring semester, Danielle Yakle’s Sculpture, Fibers, and 3D classes joined forces to produce a set of sea creatures that hung in the library.

Jelly fish in the library

For about a month in late February and early March, jellyfish, whales, rays, and sharks prowled the atrium space. Thank you to the Art students who worked together to change the ambience of Pickler Memorial Library and the library authorities who were so welcoming to this public art project.

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Giant Acorn Art

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One of several acorns on Truman’s campus. These were a project in Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to Visual Arts class, Fall 2015. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

 

Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class ended the fall semester by installing public art across campus.  This public art was the culmination of a project they had been preparing throughout the semester.  She writes:

After studying some public sculpture the students proposed ideas for a piece they could construct and install in Kirksville. The winning idea was a series of acorn sculptures that would be spread throughout campus. The students chose the form of an acorn both as a sign of the fall season and to celebrate the student body’s fascination with our local squirrel population. The project is intended to be lighthearted and to inspire a scavenger hunt-like response. We spread the sculptures throughout the campus, encouraging viewers to explore areas beyond their usual commutes and enjoy finding the pieces unexpectedly as they go about their day.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

Each acorn sculpture is between two and three feet tall and attached to a small plinth. They are constructed with a welded steel frame covered in concrete and embellished with glass mosaic and paint. Each of the eight acorns has a specific theme and color scheme designed by its student group. While the acorns’ hollow interior helps reduce the weight of each piece, we still estimate that the sculptures weigh between 200 and 250 pounds.

Take a look around campus and see how many of them you can find.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall.  Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.