Professor Lindsey Dunnagan’s Collaborative Art Project

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan invites people to participate in her new artwork at Paul Artspace Residency in Saint Louis, on August 6th.  She writes:

Carrying resentment, anger, or regret can negatively affect mental health and the body.  International Forgiveness Day (August 6th, 2017) provides an opportunity to shed these feelings.  In this interactive project, visitors are invited to Paul Artspace in Saint Louis where they can transfer unwanted negative emotions to “stones” through writing.

These stones are interconnected sculptural forms made of concrete that are absorbent and heavy.  Once participants write or draw on the concrete forms they may cover parts or their entire message with a black polish.  Then visitors can leave their stones in the forest.

Because the concrete is heavy, it serves as a metaphor of emotional weight.  Leaving the stones behind is physical act of literally letting go and a symbolic way of healing.

After the event, stones will be collected for a sculptural altar in a gallery where the project can continue. In the gallery, new visitors may write on new stones while sifting through the ones others have left. My hope is that this project can help people feel less alone and provide some peace for people who are dealing with difficult issues.

The details:

When: August 6th, 12 – 6pm

Where: Paul Artspace 14516 Sinks Rd, Florissant, MO 63034

For more details, including a map to the location, take a look at her website.

Art Projects Look to Science for Inspiration

Art professors Lindsey Dunnagan and Francine Fox promoted interdisciplinary studies by inviting their students to sketch or paint in partnership with the sciences for first-hand experience with live, unique subjects.
Dunnagan’s class worked with science professors, including Jay Bauman, Elisabeth Hooper and Timothy Waston. Bauman taught students how to attach reflective nodes to their bodies and capture motion in 360 degrees by using special recording devices in the Piper Lab. Students painted how meaning is conveyed in body movements using the technology.

In another project, students painted plants and animals from the greenhouse using elements of a Japanese marbling technique and seed collections. Walston also set up a lab for students to investigate single cell organisms from pond water. The students also explored how other objects, such as dried plants, a cracked egg and clothes, looked when magnified a thousand times.

Teams within Fox’s class created multi-panel pieces of artwork centering on a given theme to render realistic representations of their subject matter. Later depictions also included distortions of their imagery to better communicate their concepts. Continue reading