Hey! There’s an Aquarium in the OP Lobby!

Students in the Advanced Sculpture classes are at it again! For this Homecoming week, the lobby of Ophelia Parrish Hall is featuring blow-up animals, this time inside a fiber aquarium.  The sculpture is made to walk through, and the animals are far larger than life-sized.

The art installation should be up throughout the week.

Plein Air Painting on the Quad

Professor Lindsey Dunnagan’s Painting I class took advantage of the wonderful warm weather we’ve been having to go outside and practice their art outside the studio, following in the footsteps of such luminaries as Renoir and Monet.  It was beautiful but, sadly for the artists, rain is predicted for the next couple of days.

                        Violet Odzinski paints outside on a beautiful early autumn day.

Art in Unexpected Places

Have you noticed any smiling or particularly hungry-looking trash cans recently?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any giraffes nibbling on your hair?  Someone just hanging on?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling very small? or REALLY hungry?

Maybe you are experiencing ART IN UNEXPECTED PLACES, a project of Professor Lindsay Dunnagan’s Advanced Painting classes.  (Top row by Daniel Degenhardt; Second row (l) Lindsay Picht, (r) Austin Dellamano; Third row (l) Mia Palumbo, (r) Lisa Simms; Fourth row: Mona Abhari; Below: photo of class at the north gate to the university.

Art Blows Up!

Professor Danielle Yakle continues to provide Truman’s campus with art entertainment.  On September 5th, posters started to appear that advertised a pop up “Blow Up” art exhibition.  Fortunately the morning of September 7th dawned bright and clear and not too windy, and the Advanced Fibers/Sculpture classes trekked their plastic sculptures and air blowers out to the Quad and got ready to stop passersby in their tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The assignment was to create a sculpture that was a very large version of a small stuffed animal.  And as the elephant, floppy dog, unicorn, crab. and other creatures suddenly appeared, people certainly paid attention. The new art contrasted well with the art that seems more “normal” for a university campus.

 

Stay tuned for the next of the Professor Yakle’s public art projects.  And keep an eye on the Quad, and around campus generally.  You never know what you might see!

What Are Students Doing This Summer?

Students are doing exciting things over the summer.  Here are just a few of them.  Check back over the summer for pictures and updates from students and faculty, who are traveling all over the U.S. and around the world, and having adventures as they go.

Lisa Simms writes: “I will be the assistant supervisor in the summer program called the C.A.R.E. art gallery where I will be helping young high school artists hone their craft and work on different art mediums and techniques each week!”  This gallery is in Columbia, just down the road from Truman.

Another student has gone a bit further for her professional experience this summer:

Corin Hoke will be interning at the Benjamin Franklin House in London from June 17-August 15. She does not have an official title but will be helping lead tours, completing a special project of her choice, and possibly editing a book of the home’s architecture and writing articles.

 

 

BA students present work in gallery

Students completing their degrees with the BA: Liberal Arts major took over the University Gallery last week to show their work in their capstone classes.  The students whose art was featured were Olivia Brady (printmaking), Akari Kinjo (fibers/sculpture), Sabrina Lavezzi (printmaking), Hannah Nicks (ceramics), Morgan Price (ceramics), and Allyson Uhles (ceramics).  The reception to celebrate their exhibition was held on the Friday of their week in the gallery.  These pictures show some of the work and visitors enjoying the shows.

Kimono by Akari Kinjo.

Hannah Nicks’s plates on a painted wall made the ceramic work into an elaborate design of which they were only a part.

Continue reading

Art Projects Look to Science for Inspiration

Art professors Lindsey Dunnagan and Francine Fox promoted interdisciplinary studies by inviting their students to sketch or paint in partnership with the sciences for first-hand experience with live, unique subjects.
Dunnagan’s class worked with science professors, including Jay Bauman, Elisabeth Hooper and Timothy Waston. Bauman taught students how to attach reflective nodes to their bodies and capture motion in 360 degrees by using special recording devices in the Piper Lab. Students painted how meaning is conveyed in body movements using the technology.

In another project, students painted plants and animals from the greenhouse using elements of a Japanese marbling technique and seed collections. Walston also set up a lab for students to investigate single cell organisms from pond water. The students also explored how other objects, such as dried plants, a cracked egg and clothes, looked when magnified a thousand times.

Teams within Fox’s class created multi-panel pieces of artwork centering on a given theme to render realistic representations of their subject matter. Later depictions also included distortions of their imagery to better communicate their concepts. Continue reading

Department Is Featured Artist

Local art gallery Gallery 104: Art on the Square highlights the Truman State University Art Department as their featured artist for the month of April.  The Art Department has had exhibition space in Gallery 104 since their opening last summer. Student artwork is on sale, and this month you can window shop for Truman artwork in the front window as well.

 

 

On March 31st, there was a reception for the exhibitors and students who attended are shown below: (from left to right, back row) Daniel Degenhardt, Hannah Nicks, Emily LaMarche, Lindsey Picht, Jenny Reagan, Audrey Kastner, Greta Dellinger, (from left to right, front row) Karlynn Naylor, Claire Nipper, Olivia Brady, and Maddie Pearson.

A poster from the “Join, Save, Buy” exhibit in the University Gallery this past February hangs in the Gallery 104 window on the Kirksville Square.

The sea serpent that spent last summer on the Quad has found a comfortable home in the gallery (his name is Wilburt, if you hadn’t heard!).