What Are Students Doing This Summer?

Students are doing exciting things over the summer.  Here are just a few of them.  Check back over the summer for pictures and updates from students and faculty, who are traveling all over the U.S. and around the world, and having adventures as they go.

Lisa Simms writes: “I will be the assistant supervisor in the summer program called the C.A.R.E. art gallery where I will be helping young high school artists hone their craft and work on different art mediums and techniques each week!”  This gallery is in Columbia, just down the road from Truman.

Another student has gone a bit further for her professional experience this summer:

Corin Hoke will be interning at the Benjamin Franklin House in London from June 17-August 15. She does not have an official title but will be helping lead tours, completing a special project of her choice, and possibly editing a book of the home’s architecture and writing articles.

 

 

BA students present work in gallery

Students completing their degrees with the BA: Liberal Arts major took over the University Gallery last week to show their work in their capstone classes.  The students whose art was featured were Olivia Brady (printmaking), Akari Kinjo (fibers/sculpture), Sabrina Lavezzi (printmaking), Hannah Nicks (ceramics), Morgan Price (ceramics), and Allyson Uhles (ceramics).  The reception to celebrate their exhibition was held on the Friday of their week in the gallery.  These pictures show some of the work and visitors enjoying the shows.

Kimono by Akari Kinjo.

Hannah Nicks’s plates on a painted wall made the ceramic work into an elaborate design of which they were only a part.

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Art Projects Look to Science for Inspiration

Art professors Lindsey Dunnagan and Francine Fox promoted interdisciplinary studies by inviting their students to sketch or paint in partnership with the sciences for first-hand experience with live, unique subjects.
Dunnagan’s class worked with science professors, including Jay Bauman, Elisabeth Hooper and Timothy Waston. Bauman taught students how to attach reflective nodes to their bodies and capture motion in 360 degrees by using special recording devices in the Piper Lab. Students painted how meaning is conveyed in body movements using the technology.

In another project, students painted plants and animals from the greenhouse using elements of a Japanese marbling technique and seed collections. Walston also set up a lab for students to investigate single cell organisms from pond water. The students also explored how other objects, such as dried plants, a cracked egg and clothes, looked when magnified a thousand times.

Teams within Fox’s class created multi-panel pieces of artwork centering on a given theme to render realistic representations of their subject matter. Later depictions also included distortions of their imagery to better communicate their concepts. Continue reading

Department Is Featured Artist

Local art gallery Gallery 104: Art on the Square highlights the Truman State University Art Department as their featured artist for the month of April.  The Art Department has had exhibition space in Gallery 104 since their opening last summer. Student artwork is on sale, and this month you can window shop for Truman artwork in the front window as well.

 

 

On March 31st, there was a reception for the exhibitors and students who attended are shown below: (from left to right, back row) Daniel Degenhardt, Hannah Nicks, Emily LaMarche, Lindsey Picht, Jenny Reagan, Audrey Kastner, Greta Dellinger, (from left to right, front row) Karlynn Naylor, Claire Nipper, Olivia Brady, and Maddie Pearson.

A poster from the “Join, Save, Buy” exhibit in the University Gallery this past February hangs in the Gallery 104 window on the Kirksville Square.

The sea serpent that spent last summer on the Quad has found a comfortable home in the gallery (his name is Wilburt, if you hadn’t heard!).

Truman Art/Art History Alumna Featured in National Geographic

Lori Nix, who graduated from Truman (then called Northeast Missouri State University) in 1993, is featured in the April 2017 issue of National Geographic magazine.  Lori double majored in Photography and Art History and she has continued to work as an artist from her MFA at Ohio University through to her successful career in New York City.

The article is available at the National Geographic website.  Just to give you a taste of the full writeup (which has several photographs of her work), here are the first two paragraphs:

It’s the end of the world as we know it, but Lori Nix feels fine. In fact, she and Kathleen Gerber, her partner in art and life, are the cheerful architects of this apocalypse. On a gray winter day in Brooklyn, the two women are working in their chockablock apartment cum studio, carefully building small-scale dioramas of disaster.

Their goal, says Nix, is to create and photograph “open-ended narratives—models of a post-human metropolis in the future, after an unknown catastrophe.” To “unlock, engage, and provoke” viewers’ imaginations, “we want [them] to contemplate the present. Do we still have a future? Will we be able to save ourselves?”

The article also links to a short video, produced by The Drawing Room, which shows Lori and her partner Kathleen Garber working on creating one of their elaborate dioramas.

 

Call for Artists: Pickler Memorial Library Gallery Opportunity

There is an exciting new opportunity for artists at Truman.  The Pickler Memorial Library Gallery is now accepting submissions for solo or group art shows for the fall of 2017.  The student body will be able to decide the winners through voting at 15 For Art, the Truman Jazz Festival, a basketball game, and the Big Event. If you would like to show your art, please fill out the application by February 10 at 5:00 p.m.

From Spring 2016: Emeritus Professor Jim Jereb’s prints in the Pickler Memorial Library Gallery.

 

Welcome Back

Tuesday, January 16th, marks our first day back from the holidays.

To celebrate your return, you can now go octopus hunting on the quad! When you walk around campus on your way between classes be sure to check out the latest installation from Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class.

Students in Danielle Yakle’s Fall 2016 Intro to the Visual Arts class with their installation outside the library.

All photos courtesy of Atticus Bailey.

Student Artwork displayed in Gallery 104

Students from the Truman State University Art Department will display work at Gallery 104 – Art on the Square in Kirksville through the months of December and January. The student displays include work from the sculpture and photography areas.

The community is invited to a Featured Artist reception at the gallery this Friday, Dec. 2, from 5:30 – 7 p.m.  Artist Steve Easterwood will be on hand to talk about his paintings and attendees will have the chance to win a free painting, titled “Retired.” The drawing for the artwork will be between 6:00 and 6:30 p.m. during the reception.

Another Featured Artist reception will be on Friday, Jan. 6, featuring work by artist Judy Harris.

Truman students featured in the exhibition in December include Larissa Sullivan, Madee Richardt, and Madi Pearson from sculpture (working under the direction of instructor Danielle Yakle), and Stephanie Best, Athena Geldbach, Austin Hornbostel, Haley Johnson, Madison Kamp, Lu Meng, Kara Nord, and Zoe Zaiss from photography (working with instructor Amanda Breitbach).

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Professor Danielle Yakle preparing display of student work at Gallery 104 in Kirksville.

Gallery 104 is located at 104 N. Franklin St. Open hours are from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, with extended hours on Friday evenings until 7 p.m. The gallery will be open daily, Monday through Saturday in the weeks leading up to Christmas, from Dec. 12-23.