Spring Semester Begins

We hope you are finally warming up from bitter cold winter break (in Kirksville New Year’s day saw a high of 4 and a low of -17 degrees!). As we are now one week into the spring semester of 2018, we begin the Art Blog by wrapping up some of Fall 2017’s news.

The first thing we want to do is to encourage you to investigate the new art installation to be found in front of the McKinney Health Center (between that building and the Kirk Building).

Professor Danielle Yakle (in the middle of the picture above, wearing a turquoise beret) wrote, in her proposal asking to install the sculpture in its current location:

Their (her Introduction to Visual Arts students) idea was to create an installation of enlarged human organs and systems.  The various parts (a brain, heart, stomach, rib cage, etc.) will be assembled in the space much like an anatomical study.  While being somewhat educational, the main concept is to recreate objects, which are normally soft and temporary, as something that is solid and long-lasting.  The class was interested in the contrast between the ephemeral nature of the body compared to the hard and durable qualities of the concrete we are using for the sculpture. They hope to treat viewers to a surreal experience by positioning the interior of the body in an outdoor space.

These photographs (courtesy of Atticus Bailey) show the installation of the sculpture at the beginning of December.  The pieces are made of concrete and many are attached to the ground with large metal spikes, which will help to keep them in place as they are climbed upon.  Human body parts displayed include:

A brain – approximately 5’ long by 3’ high by 2.5’ wide

Two sets of ribs – 6’ by 4’ by 1’, connected with a bracket

A heart – 3’ by 3’ by 2.5’

A stomach – 5.5’ by 5’ by 2’

Two kidneys – 2.5’ by 1.5’ by 1.5’ each

Three lengths of large intestine – the largest is 7.5’ by 2.5’ by 2’

If you want to go by on a sunny day, the grassy space between Kirk and the Health Center seems to be a nice place to take in the view.

What Will Hannah Nicks Do After Graduation?

Hannah Nicks, who will graduate in December with a BA double major in Art History and Studio (Ceramics Concentration), sends us the following exciting news about what she will be doing after walking across the stage to receive her diploma:

Following my December graduation, I will begin an Art Residency at Access Arts in Columbia, Missouri. At Access Arts I will be teaching two classes, Adaptive Clay Handbuilding for adults and children with special needs, and Handbuilding & Altered Forms for more advanced students. During the residency, I plan to make a body of work that I can use to apply to a graduate program for ceramics. Along with the creation of this body of work I have a number of art shows around the midwest that I am going to apply for in order to gain exhibition experience.

Congratulations to Hannah and our other graduates!

Here are a few of Hannah’s recent works for you to admire.

Priya Kambli to Speak in New Orleans

If you are in New Orleans this coming weekend, you should take the opportunity to hear Truman Professor Priya Kambli talk about her work at the Louisiana State Museum at The Old US Mint.  She will be speaking as part of the PHOTONOLA 2017 event.  Priya’s talk is on Sunday, December 10th, at 10 am, and it is free and open to the public.  She also has a solo exhibition in New Orleans, at the Staple Goods Gallery from December 9th-January 7th.

Louisiana State Museum Old US Mint                               Staple Goods
400 Esplanade Avenue                                                      1340 St. Roch Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70116                                                         New Orleans, LA 70117
504-568-6993                                                                           504-908-7331

Hours: Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 4:30pm                         Hours: Sat + Sun, 12-5pm

 

From the PHOTONOLA 2017 website:

Priya Kambli’s artwork is intrinsically tied to her own family’s photographic legacy and her move at age 18, following the death of her parents, from India to the United States. Before she emigrated, she and her sister split their photographic inheritance in half. One portion remained in India, and the other was displaced along with Priya, in America. For the past decade, that archive of family photographs has been Priya’s primary source material in creating bodies of work which explore the migrant narrative and experience; albeit through a personal lens. Priya’s work has always touched upon universal themes, with the potential to start a dialogue about cultural differences and universal similarities. In the last year those private references and broad themes have taken on a new public significance that requires a creative response, by delving deeper into her own immigrant narrative, engaging with its personal but increasingly, if accidentally, political context.

In this free public presentation, Priya Kambli will discuss her bodies of work which explore the migrant narrative and experience as seen through a personal lens, beginning with her book Color Falls Down, and continuing through her latest project Buttons for Eyes.

 

University Gallery Event

Join us this week,  December 4th-8th, for the graduating BFA Exhibition featuring the works of graduating BFA Truman student Linan Sun and pieces featured from promising foundation students. The Reception will take place this Friday, but the show will be up Monday through Friday.

 

Both the reception and the show itself are free and open to the public.

 

Professor Kambli Honored

Professor of Photography Priya Kambli has continued to collect recognition and honors as she comes off her sabbatical year:

The Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington will host a lecture by Priya Kambli on Thursday, November 2nd, from 5:30 to 6:30 pm.  The lecture is in conjunction with the exhibition Kinship, curated by IU’s Assistant Professor of Photography Elizabeth M. Claffey and Gallery Director Betsy Stirratt.

Kinship examines the influence of family life on personal and cultural identity. Each artist delves into the complex nature of family structures to express how it shapes internal dialogue and personal narrative.

Continue reading

Professor Aaron Fine to Present on Color Theory

The next Faculty Forum event will take place at 7 p.m. Oct. 24 in Baldwin Hall 102

“Dialogues on Color” will be a presentation of Aaron Fine’s work on color theory resulting in a book of that title. This book, an inter-genre mixture of creative nonfiction, fiction and coloring book pages, is available to read free online, or purchase at cost, at www.arenotbooks.com.

Providing an intellectual history of Western attitudes towards color, the organizing aim of the book is to reveal the ways cultural context shapes our theories of color, not excluding those we link to Newton’s work with the prism and think of as objective and universally true.

For this presentation, Fine will host a mixture of activities, mingling his own lecture style with staged readings done by theatre students in the voices of Newton, Goethe, Tom Sawyer and others. There will also be opportunities for the audience to color in their own color theory coloring book pages and to win a drawing for one of five complimentary copies of the book “Dialogues on Color.”