Dusty Folwarczny (BFA 2003) to Talk to Art Students

2003 Sculpture graduate Dusty Folwarczny will return to Truman to speak with students on Monday, October 23rd. She will be working with Priya Kambli’s Art Foundations II class in the morning and will speak to the Senior Seminar class in the evening.   In addition to her active work as a sculptor in Chicago, she co-founded a company that provides illustration services where the client is an active participant in the creation process.  ink factory has developed murals, videos, and installations of various sorts for a wide range of clients, both private businesses and community and non-profit groups.Two views of “Give,” by Dusty Folwarczny, made of salvaged steel, and 14 feet tall.

Hey! There’s an Aquarium in the OP Lobby!

Students in the Advanced Sculpture classes are at it again! For this Homecoming week, the lobby of Ophelia Parrish Hall is featuring blow-up animals, this time inside a fiber aquarium.  The sculpture is made to walk through, and the animals are far larger than life-sized.

The art installation should be up throughout the week.

Art Blows Up!

Professor Danielle Yakle continues to provide Truman’s campus with art entertainment.  On September 5th, posters started to appear that advertised a pop up “Blow Up” art exhibition.  Fortunately the morning of September 7th dawned bright and clear and not too windy, and the Advanced Fibers/Sculpture classes trekked their plastic sculptures and air blowers out to the Quad and got ready to stop passersby in their tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The assignment was to create a sculpture that was a very large version of a small stuffed animal.  And as the elephant, floppy dog, unicorn, crab. and other creatures suddenly appeared, people certainly paid attention. The new art contrasted well with the art that seems more “normal” for a university campus.

 

Stay tuned for the next of the Professor Yakle’s public art projects.  And keep an eye on the Quad, and around campus generally.  You never know what you might see!

Welcome Back

Tuesday, January 16th, marks our first day back from the holidays.

To celebrate your return, you can now go octopus hunting on the quad! When you walk around campus on your way between classes be sure to check out the latest installation from Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class.

Students in Danielle Yakle’s Fall 2016 Intro to the Visual Arts class with their installation outside the library.

All photos courtesy of Atticus Bailey.

Student Artwork displayed in Gallery 104

Students from the Truman State University Art Department will display work at Gallery 104 – Art on the Square in Kirksville through the months of December and January. The student displays include work from the sculpture and photography areas.

The community is invited to a Featured Artist reception at the gallery this Friday, Dec. 2, from 5:30 – 7 p.m.  Artist Steve Easterwood will be on hand to talk about his paintings and attendees will have the chance to win a free painting, titled “Retired.” The drawing for the artwork will be between 6:00 and 6:30 p.m. during the reception.

Another Featured Artist reception will be on Friday, Jan. 6, featuring work by artist Judy Harris.

Truman students featured in the exhibition in December include Larissa Sullivan, Madee Richardt, and Madi Pearson from sculpture (working under the direction of instructor Danielle Yakle), and Stephanie Best, Athena Geldbach, Austin Hornbostel, Haley Johnson, Madison Kamp, Lu Meng, Kara Nord, and Zoe Zaiss from photography (working with instructor Amanda Breitbach).

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Professor Danielle Yakle preparing display of student work at Gallery 104 in Kirksville.

Gallery 104 is located at 104 N. Franklin St. Open hours are from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, with extended hours on Friday evenings until 7 p.m. The gallery will be open daily, Monday through Saturday in the weeks leading up to Christmas, from Dec. 12-23.

Greek Sculpture Studies at Truman

In Dr. Sara Orel’s spring Greek and Roman class, students photographed themselves in poses taken from sculpture and vase paintings of the Archaic and Classical Periods (roughly 600 BCE to 330 BCE).  This gave them a chance to study the poses, objects, and relationships of the figures.  Here are some of the photos they submitted for the assignment:

fallen warrior

Sam Pohlman as a Fallen Warrior from the pediment of the Temple of Aphaia at Aegina

Hegeso with names

kore one

Stay tuned for images from their replication of Greek painted vases.

Student Art in the Library

In the spring semester, Danielle Yakle’s Sculpture, Fibers, and 3D classes joined forces to produce a set of sea creatures that hung in the library.

Jelly fish in the library

For about a month in late February and early March, jellyfish, whales, rays, and sharks prowled the atrium space. Thank you to the Art students who worked together to change the ambience of Pickler Memorial Library and the library authorities who were so welcoming to this public art project.

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Giant Acorn Art

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One of several acorns on Truman’s campus. These were a project in Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to Visual Arts class, Fall 2015. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

 

Danielle Yakle’s Introduction to the Visual Arts class ended the fall semester by installing public art across campus.  This public art was the culmination of a project they had been preparing throughout the semester.  She writes:

After studying some public sculpture the students proposed ideas for a piece they could construct and install in Kirksville. The winning idea was a series of acorn sculptures that would be spread throughout campus. The students chose the form of an acorn both as a sign of the fall season and to celebrate the student body’s fascination with our local squirrel population. The project is intended to be lighthearted and to inspire a scavenger hunt-like response. We spread the sculptures throughout the campus, encouraging viewers to explore areas beyond their usual commutes and enjoy finding the pieces unexpectedly as they go about their day.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

An acorn sculpture in progress, showing the armature and fill before the concrete was added. Even with the lightweight center the sculptures required several people to move each of them.

Each acorn sculpture is between two and three feet tall and attached to a small plinth. They are constructed with a welded steel frame covered in concrete and embellished with glass mosaic and paint. Each of the eight acorns has a specific theme and color scheme designed by its student group. While the acorns’ hollow interior helps reduce the weight of each piece, we still estimate that the sculptures weigh between 200 and 250 pounds.

Take a look around campus and see how many of them you can find.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

Acorns waiting to get their final touches before being placed around campus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall.  Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

This acorn greets students as they walk from up the path to Violette Hall. Photo courtesy of Tim Barcus.

Gallery Opening Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.!

Please join us on Tuesday, October 20 at 6:00 p.m.for an opening reception in the University Art Gallery (OP 1114). There will be refreshments, and photographer Dana Fritz will be in attendance.

 

We have three new exhibitions that will run simultaneously until November 20, 2015:

Dana Fritz: Shaping Nature 

photography – in the main gallery

Shaping Nature includes two series by photographer Dana Fritz, Terraria Gigantica and Garden Views, in which the artist uses photography to investigate the ways in which humans display, represent, and shape nature in constructed and enclosed landscapes.

Anna Youngyeun: I feel funny, but I like it 

drawings and fibers – in the cube

Truman alumna Anna Youngyeun’s exhibition I feel funny, but I like it includes drawings and fiber arts installations that use humor, play, and tactility to address issues of bodily and racial shame.

Chandra DeBuse: Fair Shares 

ceramics – in the side gallery

In her show Fair Shares, Kansas City-based ceramicist Chandra DeBuse enlivens functional pottery with whimsical narratives.