What is going on in the first floor hallway?

In case you have been wondering:

Laura Bigger sends this report:

Students in the Intermediate Drawings Explorations course are working on large-scale drawings on the walls in Ophelia Parrish near the gallery. Passersby have the opportunity to see work in progress through November 14th. Finished work will remain until late November. Make sure to check out the students’ work!

Second Annual Blow Stuff Up on the Quad Exhibition!

 

September 14th, 2018, was a bright sunny day with relatively little wind — the perfect day to showcase the work of Advanced Sculpture, as taught by Professor Danielle Yakle.  As they did last year, students outdid themselves with playful over-life-sized toys taking over the great lawn between Ophelia Parrish and Baldwin Halls.

 

Alumni Artists to Visit Campus

MimiJimmyFLyer

Thanks to funding from the School of Arts and Letters we are happy to have Mimi Kato and Jimmy Kuehnle visit campus to give talks about their work.  Both are successful artists, living and working in Cleveland, Ohio. We hope you will be able to join us to hear about their current creative work.

The flyer has an image from Mimi Kato’s work; an example of Jimmy Kuehnle’s work is below.

Spring Semester Begins

We hope you are finally warming up from bitter cold winter break (in Kirksville New Year’s day saw a high of 4 and a low of -17 degrees!). As we are now one week into the spring semester of 2018, we begin the Art Blog by wrapping up some of Fall 2017’s news.

The first thing we want to do is to encourage you to investigate the new art installation to be found in front of the McKinney Health Center (between that building and the Kirk Building).

Professor Danielle Yakle (in the middle of the picture above, wearing a turquoise beret) wrote, in her proposal asking to install the sculpture in its current location:

Their (her Introduction to Visual Arts students) idea was to create an installation of enlarged human organs and systems.  The various parts (a brain, heart, stomach, rib cage, etc.) will be assembled in the space much like an anatomical study.  While being somewhat educational, the main concept is to recreate objects, which are normally soft and temporary, as something that is solid and long-lasting.  The class was interested in the contrast between the ephemeral nature of the body compared to the hard and durable qualities of the concrete we are using for the sculpture. They hope to treat viewers to a surreal experience by positioning the interior of the body in an outdoor space.

These photographs (courtesy of Atticus Bailey) show the installation of the sculpture at the beginning of December.  The pieces are made of concrete and many are attached to the ground with large metal spikes, which will help to keep them in place as they are climbed upon.  Human body parts displayed include:

A brain – approximately 5’ long by 3’ high by 2.5’ wide

Two sets of ribs – 6’ by 4’ by 1’, connected with a bracket

A heart – 3’ by 3’ by 2.5’

A stomach – 5.5’ by 5’ by 2’

Two kidneys – 2.5’ by 1.5’ by 1.5’ each

Three lengths of large intestine – the largest is 7.5’ by 2.5’ by 2’

If you want to go by on a sunny day, the grassy space between Kirk and the Health Center seems to be a nice place to take in the view.

Hey! There’s an Aquarium in the OP Lobby!

Students in the Advanced Sculpture classes are at it again! For this Homecoming week, the lobby of Ophelia Parrish Hall is featuring blow-up animals, this time inside a fiber aquarium.  The sculpture is made to walk through, and the animals are far larger than life-sized.

The art installation should be up throughout the week.

Art in Unexpected Places

Have you noticed any smiling or particularly hungry-looking trash cans recently?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any giraffes nibbling on your hair?  Someone just hanging on?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you feeling very small? or REALLY hungry?

Maybe you are experiencing ART IN UNEXPECTED PLACES, a project of Professor Lindsay Dunnagan’s Advanced Painting classes.  (Top row by Daniel Degenhardt; Second row (l) Lindsay Picht, (r) Austin Dellamano; Third row (l) Mia Palumbo, (r) Lisa Simms; Fourth row: Mona Abhari; Below: photo of class at the north gate to the university.

Art Blows Up!

Professor Danielle Yakle continues to provide Truman’s campus with art entertainment.  On September 5th, posters started to appear that advertised a pop up “Blow Up” art exhibition.  Fortunately the morning of September 7th dawned bright and clear and not too windy, and the Advanced Fibers/Sculpture classes trekked their plastic sculptures and air blowers out to the Quad and got ready to stop passersby in their tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The assignment was to create a sculpture that was a very large version of a small stuffed animal.  And as the elephant, floppy dog, unicorn, crab. and other creatures suddenly appeared, people certainly paid attention. The new art contrasted well with the art that seems more “normal” for a university campus.

 

Stay tuned for the next of the Professor Yakle’s public art projects.  And keep an eye on the Quad, and around campus generally.  You never know what you might see!

Professor Lindsey Dunnagan’s Collaborative Art Project

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan invites people to participate in her new artwork at Paul Artspace Residency in Saint Louis, on August 6th.  She writes:

Carrying resentment, anger, or regret can negatively affect mental health and the body.  International Forgiveness Day (August 6th, 2017) provides an opportunity to shed these feelings.  In this interactive project, visitors are invited to Paul Artspace in Saint Louis where they can transfer unwanted negative emotions to “stones” through writing.

These stones are interconnected sculptural forms made of concrete that are absorbent and heavy.  Once participants write or draw on the concrete forms they may cover parts or their entire message with a black polish.  Then visitors can leave their stones in the forest.

Because the concrete is heavy, it serves as a metaphor of emotional weight.  Leaving the stones behind is physical act of literally letting go and a symbolic way of healing.

After the event, stones will be collected for a sculptural altar in a gallery where the project can continue. In the gallery, new visitors may write on new stones while sifting through the ones others have left. My hope is that this project can help people feel less alone and provide some peace for people who are dealing with difficult issues.

The details:

When: August 6th, 12 – 6pm

Where: Paul Artspace 14516 Sinks Rd, Florissant, MO 63034

For more details, including a map to the location, take a look at her website.

Photography Professor Priya Kambli exhibits in Jaipur, India

Professor Priya Kambli’s photographs were displayed at the JaipurPhoto show in late February/early March.  JaipurPhoto is an international open-air travel photography festival held every February in the Pink City.

For the 2017 edition, JaipurPhoto’s Artistic Director, Lola Mac Dougall, invited Federica Chiocchetti, Founding Director of the photo-literary platform Photocaptionist, to be the Guest Curator and respond to the theme of wanderlust. As a Westerner, who works on the relationship between photography and fictions, images and words, and who had to ‘imagine’ and ‘study’ Jaipur and India from far away, Chiocchetti felt inclined to search for photographic works that subtly connected the notions of travel with ideas of the imaginary and the unexpected.

Professor Kambli’s work on display in Jaipur.  These are from her series “Kitchen Gods,” which takes inspiration from her own family’s photographs from India.

As the festival writeup proclaimed: “In this unique family pantheon, Kambli labours to afford her ancestors the same treatment as given to kitchen deities. The act of transforming simple snapshots into gods that watch over the nourishment of the family makes this series–although aesthetically rooted in India- a universal story.”

Priya Kambli is back in the classroom in the fall of 2017, after taking a sabbatical to work on her art full time.  Congratulations on the show, and welcome back!