Honors and Publications for Professor Priya Kambli

Truman Photography Professor Priya Kambli has had a collection of photographs added to the collection of the Duke University Library.  She received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Women Documentarians and has been added to the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University. In addition her work has been added to the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College of Chicago. Examples of the collected work can be seen through both links.

This spring Professor Kambli was the featured artist at the Ridderhof Martin Gallery at the University of Mary Washington, in Fredericksburg, Virginia.  In addition her work has been featured in two publications, Art India and The California Sunday Magazine, where she and other artists’ photographs were used to illustrate an article titled “Freedom is _______.”

New Gallery Shows Opening This Week

We have three great exhibitions opening in the University Art Gallery this week.

Retrospective: Wynne Wilbur – in the Main Gallery

Wynne Wilbur, Flower (2017).  Image courtesy of the artist.

View a career-spanning retrospective of work created by Truman ceramics professor Wynne Wilbur.

Emily Nickel, Undoing. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Dreamwork: New Work by ceramicists Leah Bowring, Emily Nickel, and Alexander Thierry – in the Main Gallery

Dreamwork features three ceramic artists, Truman alumni all, who encompass a broad range of approaches to ceramics: Leah BowringEmily NickelAlexander Thierry. Dreamwork refers to the psychoanalytic concept that our unconscious often disguises truths in our dreams from our conscious mind, but, more broadly, the works in this exhibition address the work the mind undertakes when creating memories, fantasizing, meditating, and dreaming.

Harry Tjutjuna, Wati Nyiru Munu Wati Wanka. Photo courtesy of the University of Virginia.

Claiming Country: Western Desert Painting from the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection – in the Charlyn Gallery (Exhibition on view until March 22).The Western Desert, located in west central Australia, is home to many of Australia’s indigenous communities and is seen as the birthplace of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement. Indigenous Australian art is often based on Dreamings, called Tjukurrpa in the Western Desert region. Dreamings link Aboriginal peoples to their sacred lands, often referred to as Country, through narratives of ancestors and creator beings. Western Desert artists bridge the gap between traditional Aboriginal practices and the contemporary art world by expressing Tjukurrpa in their work through ceremonial iconography and aerial perspectives of sacred landscapes associated with creator beings and ancestors. The paintings in Claiming Country explore the essential role that Country plays in the identities of Indigenous Australians. This exhibition brings together paintings by prominent Western Desert artists Pansy Napangardi, Makinti Napanangka, Weaver Jack, Harry Tjutjuna, Kathleen Petyarre, Tjumpo Tjapanangka, and Paddy Japaljarri Sims.

These works have graciously been loaned to Truman State University from the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, the only museum outside of Australia dedicated to the exhibition and study of Indigenous Australian art.

Opening reception for all three of these exhibitions will take place Friday, January 25, 6:00-8:00 p.m.

 

Welcome Back! With snowy images from new Lindsey Dunnagan show

Truman’s Spring 2019 semester begins on Monday.  We are getting about six inches of snow before classes start, so be safe as you come back to campus.


Moonlit Crossing, courtesy of the artist.

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan begins 2019 with a new show in the Twin Cities area (in Silverwood Park, Saint Anthony, on the northern side of Minneapolis). Her exhibition, “Skimming Boundaries,” was rooted in her experience with her grandmother, who battled Alzheimer’s Disease for the last ten years of her life.

In her artist’s statement, Professor Dunnagan writes:

A Familiar Face, courtesy of the artist.

 

In the beginning, her illness showed in small ways as she repeated stories she told just days before.  Toward the middle of the disease, she began reinventing the history of her life. Toward the end, my grandmother didn’t know who I was.  She lost the ability to recognize family.  Conversations with her became circular as her short-term memory began to fail as well.  In the moments when the recognizable parts of her seemed to flicker in and out, I often wondered where she had gone.  It seemed as if a part of her was testing the waters of another realm even though her physical body remained vital.

 

In this series, I explore the intangible world of the spirit and the boundary that separates us. Religion maps out worlds of before and after death, but even the most secular are confronted these questions. What is the journey between life and death?  Where are the edges?  In this series, I search for what is felt but unseen.

Blinking Current, courtesy of the artist.

Much of the work experiments with natural dyes, a technique I learned while serving in Morocco as a Peace Corps Volunteer.  Vegetation such as raspberries and cabbage are boiled and poured over mordanted paper, resulting in permanent reds, blues, and greens.  Rocks and black walnuts provide tones of sepia and simultaneously act as a resist, allowing the places they weigh down in the paper to remain white.  Sometimes paper is buried overnight and exposed to the rain or wrapped around trees to capture the imprint of bark.

The dying process, courtesy of Lindsey Dunnagan.

Stay tuned for all the exciting events coming up this spring semester at Truman.  And Welcome Back!

Last Week to See

The fall faculty show, “New Work by Truman State Art Faculty,” in the University Gallery and the Charlyn Gallery (formerly known as the Side Gallery)  will be up through Friday of this week (10/5).  If you haven’t caught the photographs and installation by Priya Kambli in the main gallery and “Grown-Up Games” by Danielle Yakle in the Charlyn Gallery, you are in for a treat.

Above and below, work by Priya Kambli, professor of art.

And below, students Josh Fackler and Josh Fish enjoy Instructor Danielle Yakle’s “Grown-Up Games.”

Wynne Wilbur is a Resident Artist in Montana

Professor Wynne Wilbur spent time this summer in a short term artist residency at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Montana. While there she worked on porcelain, returning to a material she has focused on during her sabbatical in China and since.

While at Red Lodge, Professor Wilbur was one of five Artist-Invites-Artist residents.  Pictured below are Stephanie Craig (Ohio), Chanda Zea (Oregon), Professor Wilbur, Kyung Hwa Oh (Colorado), and Todd Leech (Ohio) horizontal!

Priya Kambli to Speak in New Orleans

If you are in New Orleans this coming weekend, you should take the opportunity to hear Truman Professor Priya Kambli talk about her work at the Louisiana State Museum at The Old US Mint.  She will be speaking as part of the PHOTONOLA 2017 event.  Priya’s talk is on Sunday, December 10th, at 10 am, and it is free and open to the public.  She also has a solo exhibition in New Orleans, at the Staple Goods Gallery from December 9th-January 7th.

Louisiana State Museum Old US Mint                               Staple Goods
400 Esplanade Avenue                                                      1340 St. Roch Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70116                                                         New Orleans, LA 70117
504-568-6993                                                                           504-908-7331

Hours: Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 4:30pm                         Hours: Sat + Sun, 12-5pm

 

From the PHOTONOLA 2017 website:

Priya Kambli’s artwork is intrinsically tied to her own family’s photographic legacy and her move at age 18, following the death of her parents, from India to the United States. Before she emigrated, she and her sister split their photographic inheritance in half. One portion remained in India, and the other was displaced along with Priya, in America. For the past decade, that archive of family photographs has been Priya’s primary source material in creating bodies of work which explore the migrant narrative and experience; albeit through a personal lens. Priya’s work has always touched upon universal themes, with the potential to start a dialogue about cultural differences and universal similarities. In the last year those private references and broad themes have taken on a new public significance that requires a creative response, by delving deeper into her own immigrant narrative, engaging with its personal but increasingly, if accidentally, political context.

In this free public presentation, Priya Kambli will discuss her bodies of work which explore the migrant narrative and experience as seen through a personal lens, beginning with her book Color Falls Down, and continuing through her latest project Buttons for Eyes.

 

Professor Kambli Honored

Professor of Photography Priya Kambli has continued to collect recognition and honors as she comes off her sabbatical year:

The Grunwald Gallery of Art at Indiana University Bloomington will host a lecture by Priya Kambli on Thursday, November 2nd, from 5:30 to 6:30 pm.  The lecture is in conjunction with the exhibition Kinship, curated by IU’s Assistant Professor of Photography Elizabeth M. Claffey and Gallery Director Betsy Stirratt.

Kinship examines the influence of family life on personal and cultural identity. Each artist delves into the complex nature of family structures to express how it shapes internal dialogue and personal narrative.

Continue reading

Professor Aaron Fine to Present on Color Theory

The next Faculty Forum event will take place at 7 p.m. Oct. 24 in Baldwin Hall 102

“Dialogues on Color” will be a presentation of Aaron Fine’s work on color theory resulting in a book of that title. This book, an inter-genre mixture of creative nonfiction, fiction and coloring book pages, is available to read free online, or purchase at cost, at www.arenotbooks.com.

Providing an intellectual history of Western attitudes towards color, the organizing aim of the book is to reveal the ways cultural context shapes our theories of color, not excluding those we link to Newton’s work with the prism and think of as objective and universally true.

For this presentation, Fine will host a mixture of activities, mingling his own lecture style with staged readings done by theatre students in the voices of Newton, Goethe, Tom Sawyer and others. There will also be opportunities for the audience to color in their own color theory coloring book pages and to win a drawing for one of five complimentary copies of the book “Dialogues on Color.”

New Faculty Member: Dr. Josh Hainy

Dr. Josh Hainy in front of the “American Gothic” house in Eldon, IA.

Josh Hainy joined the Truman State University Art Department in August 2017. He received his Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Iowa with a specialization in 18th– and 19th-century European Art. Before the University of Iowa, Hainy attended the University of Oregon, where he got a Master’s degree in Classics. Drawing from his background in the classical languages, for his dissertation in Art History, he examined the ways in which British draughtsman and sculptor John Flaxman (1755-1826) depicted subject matter taken from ancient literature. Flaxman’s drawings of Homer’s Iliad received particular emphasis. These images—done in the contour style of the late 18th and early 19th centuries—became quite popular throughout Europe, but scholarly interest traditionally focused on Flaxman’s use of contour, not the ways in which he presented the narrative of the Iliad through a series of images.

“Ajax Defending the Greek Ships against the Trojans” by John Flaxman.

 

In addition to presenting his research on Flaxman’s narratives at The Art Institute of Chicago Graduate Symposium, Dr. Hainy has presented other papers about Flaxman and his interactions with classical antiquity at the annual conferences of the American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies and the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. He talked about the role of the human body in the lectures Flaxman delivered as the first Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy of Art at a symposium about art, anatomy, and medicine held at the Columbia Museum of Art. This paper will be part of an edited volume about art, anatomy, and medicine since c. 1800.

At Truman State this fall, Hainy is teaching “Introduction to the Visual Arts”, the survey of Western Art from the Renaissance to the present, and Renaissance Art in the fall. In the spring he will teach the second half of the western survey, as well as one course on Modern Art and a topics (Art 428) section on art from the 18th and early 19th centuries, titled “Rococo to Romanticism.”

We extend our enthusiastic welcome to Josh Hainy, a valued addition to the Art Department at Truman!