Congratulations to Professor Priya Kambli

Our own Priya Kambli has been chosen by the Missouri Arts Council as the recipient of the Missouri Arts Award for Individual Artist – our State’s highest honor in the arts. “Honorees are recognized for their profound and lasting contributions to Missouri’s artistic and cultural legacy.”

The press release says:

Individual Artist | Priya Kambli, Kirksville

Internationally recognized photographer whose art is suffused with themes of loss, love, and memory across generations of family, inspired by the archive of family heirlooms, artworks, and photographs she brought with her to the U.S. when she migrated from India at age 18.

Congratulations to Professor Kambli!

Professor Matthew Derezinski’s work receives honor

Professor Matthew Derezinski received Honorable Mention in 15th Pollux Non-Pro Digital Manipulation in the Landscapes and Seascapes category. The works were “Eve’s Garden” and “Forgotten Day”.
The link is here.
Eve's Garden, by Matthew Derezinski

Eve’s Garden, by Matthew Derezinski, 2020.

This 15th edition of the Pollux Awards has been pre-screened by the curators of the Worldwide Photography Gala Award and juried by Julio Hirsch-Hardy, director of the Biennial of Fine Art & Documentary Photography. A total of 439 photographers from 41 countries submitted 3,505 photographs for consideration of the pre-selection team of the Worldwide Photography Gala Awards and the final selection of the juror.

Print Professor Laura Bigger Interview

Professor Laura Bigger was the subject of an interview in Art Reveal Magazine. Congratulations on the recognition! In the interview, she talks about her own art and contemporary art more broadly. One of the focuses is on her most recent series of work, Celestial Bodies. Here is a sample of that work:

Radiate, monoprint (intaglio & relief with copper leaf), 10.5 x 14.5,” 2019

Radiate, monoprint (intaglio & relief with copper leaf), 10.5 x 14.5,” 2019

Ceramics Instructor Eric Ordway is Visiting Artist at College of the Ozarks

Truman’s Ceramicist Eric Ordway recently visited the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO (just south of Branson). The campus is currently closed to visitors but Dr. Richard Cummings and Professor Michael Ashley found a way for him to still come down and demonstrate his practice to the students.

He writes: “One of the moments that I really enjoy (besides getting to dialogue with their amazing ceramic students) was when I got to see my work installed and lighted in the studio space for the first time. I have been living with this work in my basement and my garage for the last year and it had started to feel under whelming… But when the work was displayed, lighted and given space to breath, it felt like I was able to see the pieces with new eyes. It gave me a sense of pride and confidence to continue making and continue to share my process and my vessels with the wider world.”

Congratulations to Eric Ordway for his beautiful work and impressive show. We are pleased you had a chance to share your work with a new audience!

Professor Josh Hainy Published!

Assistant Professor of Art History Josh Hainy has had an article included in Visualizing the Body in Art, Anatomy, and Medicine Since 1800: Models and Modelling, edited by Andrew Graciano, and published by Routledge.

The article, “Grecian Theory at the Royal Academy: John Flaxman and the Pedagogy of Corporeal Representation,” grows out of research on John Flaxman that was a part of his dissertation at the University of Iowa.

Welcome Back! With snowy images from new Lindsey Dunnagan show

Truman’s Spring 2019 semester begins on Monday.  We are getting about six inches of snow before classes start, so be safe as you come back to campus.


Moonlit Crossing, courtesy of the artist.

Painting professor Lindsey Dunnagan begins 2019 with a new show in the Twin Cities area (in Silverwood Park, Saint Anthony, on the northern side of Minneapolis). Her exhibition, “Skimming Boundaries,” was rooted in her experience with her grandmother, who battled Alzheimer’s Disease for the last ten years of her life.

In her artist’s statement, Professor Dunnagan writes:

A Familiar Face, courtesy of the artist.

 

In the beginning, her illness showed in small ways as she repeated stories she told just days before.  Toward the middle of the disease, she began reinventing the history of her life. Toward the end, my grandmother didn’t know who I was.  She lost the ability to recognize family.  Conversations with her became circular as her short-term memory began to fail as well.  In the moments when the recognizable parts of her seemed to flicker in and out, I often wondered where she had gone.  It seemed as if a part of her was testing the waters of another realm even though her physical body remained vital.

 

In this series, I explore the intangible world of the spirit and the boundary that separates us. Religion maps out worlds of before and after death, but even the most secular are confronted these questions. What is the journey between life and death?  Where are the edges?  In this series, I search for what is felt but unseen.

Blinking Current, courtesy of the artist.

Much of the work experiments with natural dyes, a technique I learned while serving in Morocco as a Peace Corps Volunteer.  Vegetation such as raspberries and cabbage are boiled and poured over mordanted paper, resulting in permanent reds, blues, and greens.  Rocks and black walnuts provide tones of sepia and simultaneously act as a resist, allowing the places they weigh down in the paper to remain white.  Sometimes paper is buried overnight and exposed to the rain or wrapped around trees to capture the imprint of bark.

The dying process, courtesy of Lindsey Dunnagan.

Stay tuned for all the exciting events coming up this spring semester at Truman.  And Welcome Back!

Last Week to See

The fall faculty show, “New Work by Truman State Art Faculty,” in the University Gallery and the Charlyn Gallery (formerly known as the Side Gallery)  will be up through Friday of this week (10/5).  If you haven’t caught the photographs and installation by Priya Kambli in the main gallery and “Grown-Up Games” by Danielle Yakle in the Charlyn Gallery, you are in for a treat.

Above and below, work by Priya Kambli, professor of art.

And below, students Josh Fackler and Josh Fish enjoy Instructor Danielle Yakle’s “Grown-Up Games.”

Wynne Wilbur is a Resident Artist in Montana

Professor Wynne Wilbur spent time this summer in a short term artist residency at Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Montana. While there she worked on porcelain, returning to a material she has focused on during her sabbatical in China and since.

While at Red Lodge, Professor Wilbur was one of five Artist-Invites-Artist residents.  Pictured below are Stephanie Craig (Ohio), Chanda Zea (Oregon), Professor Wilbur, Kyung Hwa Oh (Colorado), and Todd Leech (Ohio) horizontal!